Brian Fauteux, Assistant Professor, Music, University of Alberta

Brian Fauteux, Assistant Professor, Music, University of Alberta

BY: Catherine Nygren

PRINT IMRPIMER

Prior to his PhD in Communication Studies, Brian Fauteux completed his MA in Media Studies at Concordia. He was initially unsure about pursuing the PhD—it was a significant time commitment, especially for an uncertain job market. However, through the encouragement of his supervisors and mentors, he applied to a few programs and ended up continuing at Concordia. His MA, and then PhD, co-supervisor was a particularly important mentor, and shared information about timelines, dissertation writing, teaching, and other professional experiences.

In fact, Brian felt a good sense of community overall within the department. His colleagues were friendly and supportive, and the collaborative support systems that formed were extremely important to him during the program. Faculty members helped him network at conferences, and the graduate director at the time encouraged a good energy among the students. Even after graduating, he still feels this sense of community, particularly at the annual Canadian Communication Studies Association conferences.

Brian finished his degree in four years—having two dedicated supervisors and SSHRC helped him finish on time. After a year of research, he completed the first draft of his dissertation, on Canadian campus radio, within a few months, due largely to having no other commitments other than concentrating on his writing.

Because he completed so quickly, he had a quick turnaround time when applying to post-docs. During a post-doc at Wisconsin-Madison, he started applying for more tenure-track positions. He moved back to Toronto for sessional positions at various universities around Ontario, but travelling and teaching at so many institutions made it difficult to make connections.

Now, Brian is an assistant professor of popular music and media studies in the Music Department at the University of Alberta. His dissertation was developed into a book, Music Range: The Culture of Canadian Campus Radio, and he continues to work on issues surrounding music and culture, including satellite radio, independent music, and the constitution of culture through private and mobile listening practices.

When reflecting on his PhD experience, Brian notes that more workshops on professional development, such as turning course papers into publications, preparing a competitive academic CV, or planning for lectures, would have been beneficial. Although he learned a lot by navigating the system himself, programs need a middle ground where structured support can meet individual initiative.

 


 

Poll – Supervision

Prior to his PhD in Communication Studies, Brian Fauteux completed his MA in Media Studies at Concordia. He was initially unsure about pursuing the PhD—it was a significant time commitment, especially for an uncertain job market. However, through the encouragement of his supervisors and mentors, he applied to a few programs and ended up continuing at Concordia. His MA, and then PhD, co-supervisor was a particularly important mentor, and shared information about timelines, dissertation writing, teaching, and other professional experiences.

In fact, Brian felt a good sense of community overall within the department. His colleagues were friendly and supportive, and the collaborative support systems that formed were extremely important to him during the program. Faculty members helped him network at conferences, and the graduate director at the time encouraged a good energy among the students. Even after graduating, he still feels this sense of community, particularly at the annual Canadian Communication Studies Association conferences.

Brian finished his degree in four years—having two dedicated supervisors and SSHRC helped him finish on time. After a year of research, he completed the first draft of his dissertation, on Canadian campus radio, within a few months, due largely to having no other commitments other than concentrating on his writing.

Because he completed so quickly, he had a quick turnaround time when applying to post-docs. During a post-doc at Wisconsin-Madison, he started applying for more tenure-track positions. He moved back to Toronto for sessional positions at various universities around Ontario, but travelling and teaching at so many institutions made it difficult to make connections.

Now, Brian is an assistant professor of popular music and media studies in the Music Department at the University of Alberta. His dissertation was developed into a book, Music Range: The Culture of Canadian Campus Radio, and he continues to work on issues surrounding music and culture, including satellite radio, independent music, and the constitution of culture through private and mobile listening practices.

When reflecting on his PhD experience, Brian notes that more workshops on professional development, such as turning course papers into publications, preparing a competitive academic CV, or planning for lectures, would have been beneficial. Although he learned a lot by navigating the system himself, programs need a middle ground where structured support can meet individual initiative.

 


 

Poll – Supervision

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

OR AS GUEST

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Participer en tant qu’invité