Tim Krywulak, Professor and Program Coordinator, Georgian College

Tim Krywulak, Professor and Program Coordinator, Georgian College

BY: as told by Tim Krywulak / as written by Catherine Nygren

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Tim KrywulakI started my doctoral program in history in 2000, working on the foundations of Canada’s modern welfare state. During my degree, I was a TA, worked as an editorial assistant, and taught online courses, which supplemented internal and external scholarships.

My program was tight-knit, and there was a sense of community with faculty members as well—many helped me with my thesis, including a retired professor who gave me a job and mentorship both in and out of the program.

I completed my degree in five years, which felt like about the right amount of time—I might have finished earlier if I had taken on less contract work, but I enjoyed doing that, it strengthened my work as a scholar, and it gave me skills to use outside of academia.

Immediately following graduation, my first job was sessional teaching position at Carleton. Then, one of my professors put me in touch with the Canadian Gas Association, and they gave me a full-time contract for writing a book. As that project was finishing up, I was also able to pick up some courses at Royal Military College of Canada and some additional contract work.

My main goal was to secure a full-time academic position, but it didn’t happen for me at that time. Looking to broaden my experience and career opportunities, I started applying for jobs in public policy research (which was broadly related to my doctoral work). I had previously interviewed with the Conference Board of Canada, but didn’t get hired. With the additional experience I had gained in contract work, I decided to check in with them again. I emailed a manager there in the afternoon, got a reply for an interview the next day, and landed the job in the interview.

That job led to other opportunities in policy research and project management, and even back in academia—I’m currently a faculty member and coordinator for the Research Analyst and Big Data Analytics programs at Georgian College. Although my doctoral work isn’t directly relevant to my current position in terms of the specific subject matter, the skills I learned—conducting primary research and secondary research, turning research evidence into clear and compelling stories, and making effective verbal presentations—certainly are.

 

Tim KrywulakI started my doctoral program in history in 2000, working on the foundations of Canada’s modern welfare state. During my degree, I was a TA, worked as an editorial assistant, and taught online courses, which supplemented internal and external scholarships.

My program was tight-knit, and there was a sense of community with faculty members as well—many helped me with my thesis, including a retired professor who gave me a job and mentorship both in and out of the program.

I completed my degree in five years, which felt like about the right amount of time—I might have finished earlier if I had taken on less contract work, but I enjoyed doing that, it strengthened my work as a scholar, and it gave me skills to use outside of academia.

Immediately following graduation, my first job was sessional teaching position at Carleton. Then, one of my professors put me in touch with the Canadian Gas Association, and they gave me a full-time contract for writing a book. As that project was finishing up, I was also able to pick up some courses at Royal Military College of Canada and some additional contract work.

My main goal was to secure a full-time academic position, but it didn’t happen for me at that time. Looking to broaden my experience and career opportunities, I started applying for jobs in public policy research (which was broadly related to my doctoral work). I had previously interviewed with the Conference Board of Canada, but didn’t get hired. With the additional experience I had gained in contract work, I decided to check in with them again. I emailed a manager there in the afternoon, got a reply for an interview the next day, and landed the job in the interview.

That job led to other opportunities in policy research and project management, and even back in academia—I’m currently a faculty member and coordinator for the Research Analyst and Big Data Analytics programs at Georgian College. Although my doctoral work isn’t directly relevant to my current position in terms of the specific subject matter, the skills I learned—conducting primary research and secondary research, turning research evidence into clear and compelling stories, and making effective verbal presentations—certainly are.

 

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